India

India to get new landslide warning system soon, prototype testing underway

New Delhi: The Geological Survey of India (GSI), Ministry of Mines, in collaboration with the British Geological Survey, has developed a prototype regional landslide early warning system (LEWS) for India, and is currently being evaluated and tested by GSI in two pilots. In India in the Darjeeling district of West Bengal region and Nilgiris district of Tamil Nadu. ( landslide warning system)

Also read: ‘Dry Day’ for Bihar Police but 8 lakh CAPF employees will soon be allowed to buy liquor online

LANDSLIP Research has conducted two tests in 2020

GSI has been engaged in developing an experimental Regional Landslide Early Warning System (LEWS) based on rainfall thresholds since 2017 through the LANDSLIP project. LANDSLIP research has developed a prototype model based on terrain-specific rainfall thresholds for two test areas in 2020 – Darjeeling and Nilgiris. Landslip is presently in the process of transferring the above instruments of regional LEWS to the National Nodal Agency (GSI) for carrying out a similar effort in several landslide prone states in India.

Landslide warning system to be added by 2022

Since the 2020 monsoon, the GSI has also started issuing daily landslide forecast bulletins during monsoon to the district administration in two pilot areas for testing and evaluation. GSI has taken up R&D activities and ground work for development of regional LEWS in other trial areas like Uttarakhand, Kerala, Sikkim from 2021 onwards and plans to connect five additional states – Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Assam, Meghalaya and Mizoram by 2022. There is also a plan. ( landslide warning system)

Shivam Bangwal

Shivam Bangwal is an India-based Entrepreneur. He is the Founder of Successful Startups like Youthistaan, People News Chronicle & Branding Panther. Shivam has done his Master's in Computer Applications.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button